Body shaming comes in all shapes and sizes

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Body shaming

 

The other day, a couple of (well-meaning) people thought it was okay to comment about my weight on Facebook. If I were heavier, I think it would be un-PC to call me out on it. But I weigh in on the smaller side with a lean BMI. The biggest (no pun intended) thing to note, however, is that my weight is nobody’s business, except my physician’s. What is important is that body shaming is inappropriate toward any size or shape. A few years ago, I wrote an article for In With Skin magazine—titled “Body Image Can Shape Well-Being”—about the ways people close to us may influence our feelings toward our bodies, either positively or negatively, plus tips on how to develop a healthy body image. And as someone who has lived in the shadows of an eating disorder for decades, I speak from experience. It’s okay to express concern (privately, rather than on social media). But remember: words create a lasting impression.

How’s your body image?

Image courtesy of Aleksa D at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Relax! it’s just social media

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Social media gaffe

[Image credit: digitart]

Wow wow wow. My head is still spinning over a social media gaffe I still can’t believe happened. It began with a harmless little joke I wrote on a friend’s Facebook status (which had also picked on another friend). But it became apparent right away that saying anything at all about their post, even in jest, was offensive. To make matters worse, after I apologized I tried to lighten the tone and wham, out comes the profanity. Seriously? This is Facebook, people—a forum for sharing inane prattle, family photos, weather forecasts, silly memes, political rants and ice bucket challenges. News flash: When you post anything on the Internet, you expose yourself to public ridicule and the possibility for a debate. It’s the nature of the social media beast. Bottom line: If you can’t take the heat, you know what to do. Or why not just unfriend the offending party … that’s what I did. Play nice, people.

Have you ever been reprimanded for your social media behavior?

Humor me

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[Image credit: digitalart]

The other day I wanted to share with two different people a couple of tidbits I thought were cool.  Both of them told me they weren’t interested.  It hurt my feelings to be brushed aside, so I did the next best thing: posted it on Facebook.  Most days, at least one person goes on and on to me about something in particular or maybe nothing important, but I try to listen.  Granted, sometimes my mind wanders, but typically I stay plugged in.  After all, it isn’t that hard to lend an ear.  And we just may be the only one that person comes in contact with on a given day and maybe they simply need to feel like someone cares.  But if you run into me and I start to ramble, it’s okay to stop me mid-sentence to say you have somewhere to be (even if you don’t).  Just humor me if you’re able to.

How do you handle the person who always has a story to tell?

A cyber burnout

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[Image credit: Nutdanai Apikhomboonwaroot]

A couple of weeks ago I wrote about a self-imposed time out.  It’s when enough is enough and you just need to step away from technology and all its demands.  Not the commitments that are necessary to keep business running smoothly or remain available for family, but the ones that take us away from the things we should be doing.  In fact, sometimes I’d like to declare an email bankruptcy — an opportunity to purge every message and start over with a clean inbox.  Other times I tell myself: only one more game of Words With Friends and then I’ll start the laundry, do the dusting, make dinner, work on taxes, write 100 words, fill in the blank.  When it gets to a point where your life revolves more around your IP address than the location you call home, it may be time to pull the plug for a pre-determined period in order to regroup.  For example, I’ve known friends who have taken a hiatus from Facebook for weeks at a time to focus on whatever it is that needs attention on their side of the monitor.  I’m getting close to that place, myself.

Does your real life take a back seat to the cyber world, or is it well-balanced between the two?

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