An amazing life

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I spent the past 31 days reciting a positive affirmation each morning. I practice Bikram yoga, attend church, volunteer my time, share laughter with friends and family, work in a field I’m passionate about and engage in fulfilling hobbies. I wake up every day and choose happiness, yet I seem to be missing something. Through Family Share and its 15 steps to ensure an amazing life, however, I discovered a few missing links.

  1. Connect with yourself and others
  2. Live in the present
  3. Always create
  4. Cultivate an “attitude of gratitude”
  5. Choose a mentor wisely
  6. Give your body the gift of rest and relaxation
  7. Eat for happiness (skip processed foods, enjoy healthy fats)
  8. Cleanse your body
  9. Cleanse your mind
  10. Cleanse your spirit
  11. Establish healthy boundaries
  12. Let go of anything that doesn’t serve you
  13. Set SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, timely)
  14. It’s a practice, not a perfect
  15. Help others

Where do you miss the mark?

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Permission to flourish

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Permission to flourish

Believe you will succeed, and you will.
~ Dale Carnegie

My last post, “No more apologies,” was about just that. Instead, I’ve been letting [aka training] the people in my life to know it’s essential I have my “writing time” each day, no questions asked. Unless someone is bleeding, I want no interruptions. The first day, I briefed my family before I shut the door to the outside world (except for my cats). For one hour I revised an essay, as well as rambled for 168 words in my personal blog. The 60 minutes flew by (proving the theory once again that time does fly when you’re having fun) and, when my timer chimed, I felt refreshed and happy—nourished. And the more I write, the more I want to write. It seems my muse has been waiting for permission to flourish unhindered by expectations, boundaries and guilt. To reign free. I’m excited to see where it takes me.

What do you need to make regular time for?

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

A simple touch of kindness

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A simple touch of kindness

[Image credit: chrisroll]

During Yoga practice and the spine strengthening series, yogis rest on their stomachs in between poses.  At that time, some of the instructors will “walk” on any eager feet.  The last time I was the recipient of this brief exchange, I was thankful for the willingness of my teacher to freely offer the gift of touch to her students.  During that moment of meditation, I felt a strong appreciation and wondered how many others in my life crave such a simple act of affection.  It seems we are more concerned about crossing over boundaries or insulting so we keep our distance.  That’s not what I want to be remembered for.  I would rather be thought of as the person who stepped outside her comfort zone and embraced a fellow mother, daughter, brother … human being.  Perhaps we’d be a lot happier if we didn’t worry so much about whom we offend, but instead care about those we friend.

Do you regularly show others kindness through a simple touch?

More *is* better

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[Image credit: Stuart Miles]

Before I begin a contracted writing assignment, I ask what the word count is.  For some reason, it’s always been helpful for me to have a number to either shoot for, or to remain between the boundaries.  For a recent article I was working on, the word count was 800.  At first, I didn’t know if I could find enough material to fill the space, but thankfully it didn’t take long and I was up to 1,200 words.  After the first round of edits, I was closer to 800.  But after the second, I clocked in at 600-something.  Thankfully, the art director for the publication was able to format the piece to fill the space.  And I realized how in some cases, more is better.  The more of something you have — in my case, words — the easier it is to pare it down to what you need.  In other words, if you start out with more, you can typically subtract from.

When do you think more is better?